Showing all 4 results

Ray Charles – Genius + Soul = Jazz 180g Analogue Productions Vinyl

£49.95
"Genius + Soul = Jazz is a winner, now sounding better than ever. I like this reissue so much I'll probably not play my original again since it isn't in quite as nice condition. In fact, I'm not sure if I really need to even keep my original in the collection at this point given the quality of this reissue. And that is probably the best complement I can offer." — Mark Smotroff, Audiophile Review, May 17, 2021.

Ray Charles – The Genius Sings the Blues 180g Mofi Vinyl

£49.95
MUST-HAVE SONGS FROM CHARLES' PEAK ERA
The Genius Sings the Blues began as a simple compilation. Comprised of a dozen songs Ray Charles made between 1952 and 1960, the collection was released in 1961 by Atlantic Records to counter the singer's migration to rival ABC Paramount. What Atlantic originally underestimated is that the album contained many of Charles' greatest works, all unified by their bluesy emotions and stirring arrangements. A classic of the soul and R&B canon, The Genius Sings the Blues is a snapshot of the evolution of timeless American music captured by the pianist's indelible rhythmic pace, gospel roots, jazz backgrounds, and Southern-styled accents.

Ray Charles – Ray Charles – Analogue Productions Atlantic 75 Series 45 rpm 180g Vinyl

£75.00
NOW IN STOCK
Ray Charles’ self-titled 1957 album was one of the first handful of LPs issued by Atlantic (and was later retitled Hallelujah I Love Her So). As AllMusic reviewer Bruce Elder notes, the album is weighted about three to one in favor of Charles’ own compositions, with the hits “Hallelujah I Love Her So” and the pounding, soaring “Ain’t That Love,” which opens the LP, its raison d’etre.

Ray Charles – Ray Charles – Analogue Productions Atlantic 75 Series Hybrid Mono SACD

£45.00
Available Pre-Order
Ray Charles’ self-titled 1957 album was one of the first handful of albums issued by Atlantic (and was later retitled Hallelujah I Love Her So). As AllMusic reviewer Bruce Elder notes, the album is weighted about three to one in favor of Charles’ own compositions, with the hits “Hallelujah I Love Her So” and the pounding, soaring “Ain’t That Love,” which opens the record, its raison d’etre.